STAR TRIBUNE BOOK REVIEW: “The Tell,” by Hester Kaplan

STAR TRIBUNE BOOK REVIEW: “The Tell,” by Hester Kaplan

BOOK REVIEW: “The Tell,” http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/meglio-viagra-o-levitra by Hester Kaplan. An aging but charismatic actor moves in next door to a couple whose marriage is already in trouble. Hester Kaplan’s novel “The Tell” occupies that peculiar literary middle earth where everything is about relationships enacted against a history that has shaped the characters to respond in significant ways to problems put in their paths. In this case, the characters are a married couple, Mira Thrasher and Owen Brewer (“Thrasher and Brewer,” another character says, “like exhibits in the Museum of Industry”), occupying a multi-storied old house in Providence. Mira inherited the house at a youthful age when her parents — days after Mira had revealed her father’s affair with her mother’s best friend — died in a car accident. What sets the story in motion is the appearance of a superannuated viagra sans ordonnance television star (whose decades-old show, “Ancient Times,” Mira has taken to watching to outwait her insomnia), Wilton Deere. (The character he played was called Bruno Macon, and Owen wonders of the “real” http://www.laviagraes.com/comprar-viagra-generico name: “Was that any more of an authentic name?”) Wilton has purchased the equally wonderful Victorian house next door, in order to be closer to Anya, his only child, whom he’d abandoned early on under circumstances that have colored his entire life with guilt. Of guilt, there’s plenty to go around. Owen, a teacher in a pitifully disadvantaged school, has never quite recovered from what he sees as his craven response to a confrontation in a restaurant that left him alive and his girlfriend dead. Mira, of course, blames herself for her parents’ accident,...
Stephanie Vandrick Reads: “Unravished”

Stephanie Vandrick Reads: “Unravished”

“Unravished,” by Hester Kaplan Because I was both shaken by and drawn into the worlds of the two books by Hester Kaplan that I read earlier, I was happy to hear of and read her new book, “Unravished: Stories” (Ig, 2014). The two earlier books are “The Edge of Marriage: Stories,” about which I posted on 2/15/13, and “The Tell,” which I wrote about here on 6/29/13. I used the overused, but apt in this case, term “heartbreaking” about the first book, and that word could be applied to the second and now the third of her works of fiction that I have read (she also published an earlier novel, “Kinship Theory,” which I have not yet read). A basic question that Kaplan’s characters keep having to ask, consciously or unconsciously, is how they acheter viagra can possibly live with the seemingly impossible-to-accept situations in which viagra sans ordonnance they have somehow been placed. In the case of “Unravished”: What if your spouse is doing something you find morally unacceptable? How do you deal with mixed feelings of revulsion and excitement about the actions of a former lover? How do you face finding you have symptoms of a possibly fatal illness? How can you possibly make sense of slowly realizing that a young girl you are starting to know is being used and abused by a repugnant neighbor? And there are other instances of abuse, of trauma, of life-changing news, and of characters unable to negotiate the difficulties and obstacles of life. How can they possibly face and cope with these life events? Yet http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/efectos-de-viagra-en-jovenes they do, they do,...
THE BROOKLYN PAPER: Background stories

THE BROOKLYN PAPER: Background stories

Background stories: F’Greene-published short story collection digs up the past Regrets? They’ve had a few — and it makes for great reading! Hester Kaplan’s new short story collection “Unravished,” published by Fort Greene’s Ig Press earlier this year, is the work of an accomplished writer in command of her genre. Each viagra en neonatos of the eight stories in the collection is tadalafil troche dosage worth reading — most are excellent, and a few are unforgettable. You will know those in the latter category when you finish them and their full import sinks in. You will feel aghast or exhilarated, electrified by the awareness http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/sildenafil-comprar-online you have just brushed against something profound. The book’s general milieu is New England. The environments, people, and situations encountered tend to be middle-class or above, but the emotional range is broad and deep. Kaplan’s protagonists are adults with adult concerns — people with the sorts of complicated lives recognizable to anyone who has weathered a long-term relationship or two. The theme, http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/precio-del-viagra often, is the role or relevance of the past — ex-lovers, historic homes, more ex-lovers, landscapes made famous by dead painters, buried regrets, and kids from previous relationships. Some of Kaplan’s characters are clinging to what should be closed chapters of their lives, while others fight to escape bygones that won’t stay gone. Guilt, obligation, passionate love, or sentimental force of habit all make letting go hard to do. Several of the stories hinge on secrets long held and climactically revealed. One https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/viagra-prix-en-pharmacie/ tale in particular brings down the hammer with a last-act revelation that took this reader’s breath away —...
LIBRARY JOURNAL: Top Indie Fiction

LIBRARY JOURNAL: Top Indie Fiction

Kaplan, Hester. Unravished. Ig. Jun. 2014. 224p. ISBN 9781935439905. pap. $16.95. SHORT STORIES Author of two novels and winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, Kaplan delivers an exceptional collection with beautifully rendered stories for and about grown-ups. The cialis pas cher second wife of a bombastic older man fends off neighbors distraught by https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/viagra-en-ligne/ his building plans, which could hurt the environment (and maybe the neighborhood?); a man plays father to his girlfriend’s son at the circus. VERDICT For readers, not just short story fans, who like fiction focusing smartly on contemporary https://www.levitradosageus24.com/how-long-does-levitra-work/ adult relationships. REVIEW...
Caroline Leavittville: Hester Kaplan talks about The Tell

Caroline Leavittville: Hester Kaplan talks about The Tell

Hester Kaplan talks about The Tell, how we know the ones we love, social media and so much more                   The Tell by Hester Kaplan, about marriage, loyalty, secrets, and how we really know the ones we love, is one knockout novel. Hester is also the author of i THE EDGE OF MARRIAGE (1999) which won the Flannery O’Connor Award https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/viagra-100mg/ for Short Fiction, and KINSHIP THEORY(2001), a novel. Her stories and non-fiction have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories series (1998, 1999), Ploughshares, Agni Review, Southwest Review, Story, and Glimmer Train. Recent awards include the Salamander Fiction Prize, the McGinness-Ritchie Award for Non-Fiction, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. She is on the faculty of Lesley University’s MFA Program in Creative Writing. I’m thrilled to have her here. Thank you, Hester.   All the characters in your novel are just achingly alive, and all have secrets, but Owen suffers the most. What was it like writing a character like that?   I feel a great affinity for Owen and his inner turmoil.  He’s a guy I’d like to know even better.  I think a writer must be intrigued by her own characters; there must be something still unknown about them.  What Owen wants out of life is elusive, even to him, and I could only help him so much, and then it was up to him.  When I wanted him to talk, he wouldn’t.  When we’re down or troubled or confused, we’re told that “talking about it” will help. I’m still amazed by...
A conversation with Hester Kaplan

A conversation with Hester Kaplan

A conversation with Hester Kaplan Gambling plays an important part in straining your characters Mira and Owen’s marriage. Why did you choose this particular vice for your novel? I am no fan of gambling, but I’m interested in what drives people, particularly women, to the slot machines. In interviewing women who’d become hooked on the rush they get from the playing the slots, I was struck by how solitary, secretive, and severe their addictions were. Many of the women were still stunned by how quickly they’d gotten in trouble and debt, and how easy it was for them to lie, elaborately, about it to their friends, family, spouses. In The Tell, I took Mira to the slot machines precisely because it seemed so unlikely for it to happen to “someone like her.” But the truth is, you never know who’s going to get hooked, and Owen could not imagine it would ever happen to his wife. Mira http://www.viagragenericoes24.com/viagra-casero and Owen’s Victorian house plays such a pivotal role in THE TELL that it almost seems like another character in the book. And I know you have a Pinterest board (http://pinterest.com/hesterkaplan/explore-the-tell/) where you collect images of Victorian houses that inspired the atmosphere and rooms in the book. Can you talk a little bit about how these houses inspire you? I live in a city where my daily walks take me past many amazing and varied examples of Victorian architecture. Balustrades, spindles, gables, rounded porches, turrets, towers, rows of shingles—these are the fanciful elements and ornamentation that first catch my eye and spark my imagination. I imagine one of my characters standing...