GOAT HILL

GOAT HILL Goat Hill produces a wide range of literary events in and around Rhode Island, and offers writing workshops, seminars, and one-on-one mentoring and editorial services. A sample of our recent events: “Food Stars” with Ruth Reichl and Michael Ruhlman “Thrillers” with Laura Lippman and Alison Gaylin “The Art of the Memoir” with Dani Shapiro and Andre Dubus III “Editor and Author” with Jill Bialosky and Akhil Sharma, Agent Speed-Dating Workshop-Palooza! A sample of our recent seminars: From Story to Plot The Art of Writing Dialogue Flash Fiction and Essat Beginnings Character Building The Narrative Engine Goat Hill is committed to supporting writers and readers of all ages and creating a vibrant literary scene through innovative programming and community involvement.  Goat Hill is proud to partner with School One on Write Rhode Island! a state-wide writing competition for students in grades 8 – 12, now in its fifth season.  Write Rhode Island! gives free writing workshops to students across the state, and produces an anthology of the winning stories. Please visit our website for more information on Goat Hill and Write Rhode Island! MORE...
Harper Reviews: New Fiction – The Tell

Harper Reviews: New Fiction – The Tell

New Fiction: The Tell – Hester Kaplan  This book won me over with the sentences–I think I was in love five pages in. Kaplan is the sort of writer who can make a sentence a synesthetic experience. An example: check out her description of the young husband of the story describing the vacant old Baltimore mansion next door to his home: He’d been inside only once, after the ancient owner had croaked in her bed and the place had been efficiently emptied by her officious out-of-state children.  The apocalyptic vacancy of the rooms, the fissured ceilings, the washcloth on the floor of the tub, the isopropyl chill in the air, had awed him. There was something about all those aristocratic details of leaded glass, inlaid floors and lights hanging like distended organs that made him think of an old man, useless now in a threadbare suit and expensive shoes whom no one wanted to talk to anymore.  He couldn’t imagine who would want to take on the colossus—smaller and less elaborate than the one he and Mira lived in, but still daunting and ridiculous enough—who would want to coddle it and tend to its bounty of needs, its pickiness.” Thrilling. So what about the plot? It’s the story of a young couple whose lives are upended when a forgotten TV star moves into the house next to theirs. Maybe it’s because this story takes place in Baltimore, but Kaplan’s humor and generosity—the way the improbable is made logical—all reminded me of Anne Tyler. Overall though, this book felt darker, the risks and errors a little more breath-taking. What both writers have in common...